Katarzyna Pyżewicz

PhD Katarzyna Pyżewicz
PhD Katarzyna Pyżewicz

e-mail: k.pyzewicz@uw.edu.pl

duty hours:
online via Google Meet: Monday 13.30-15.00, Tuesday 12.00-13.00, the link to the meeting will be sent after the student’s e-mail request

research interests:
Paleolithic and Mesolithic archaeology/ use-wear analysis/ lithic studies/ experimental archaeology

bibliography:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Katarzyna_Pyzewicz
https://uw.academia.edu/KatarzynaPy%C5%BCewicz

Agnieszka Tomas

Agnieszka Tomas
PhD Agnieszka Tomas

e-mail: agnieszka.tomas@uw.edu.pl

duty hours:
2019/ 2020 sabbatical

research interests:
Archaeology of the Roman provinces, Roman frontier studies, archaeology of the Lower Danubian provinces

bibliography:

  1. Inter Moesos et Thraces. The Rural Hinterland of Novae in Lower Moesia (1st – 6th centuries AD), Archaeopress, Oxford 2016 (29 ark) ISBN 9781784913694
  2. Living with the Army I. Civil Settlements near Roman Legionary Fortresses in Lower Moesia, Warszawa 2017. ISBN 978-83-61376-35-4
  3. Reading Gender and Social Life in Military Spaces, Światowit 49/A, 2009-2010 (2011), 139–152.
  4. Connecting to Public Water: The Rural Landscape and Water Supply of Lower Moesia, Archaeologia Bulgarica 15/2, 2011, 59–72.
  5. Canabae legionis I Italicae: state of research on civil settlements accompanying the legionary camp in Novae (Lower Moesia) compared to relevant Lower Danubian sites, Światowit L/A, 2011 (2012), 155–168.
  6. A Roman site in the Sarviz River Valley (Pannonia Inferior). Preliminary results Acta Archaeologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 66/1, 2015, 203–215. (with Z. Kis)
  7. A New Dedicatory Inscription from Novae (Lower Moesia), Światowit 52/A, 2013 (2014), 79–86.
  8. A Six-century pottery kiln from Novae (Moesia secunda). A contribution to the local pottery manufacturing, Archaeologia Bulgarica 19/3, 2015, 63–74.
  9. Life on the Frontier: Roman Military Families in Lower Moesia, Studia Europaea Gnesnensia 16, 2017, 225-257.
  10. Castra et canabae legionis. Organizacja przestrzeni i administracja cywilnych osiedli przy rzymskich obozach legionowych [w] Między murami miasta a ścianami koszar – garnizony i historia miejska na przestrzeni dziejów [=Zeszyty Naukowe UJ. Prace Historyczne 145 (4)], Kraków 2018, 665–
  11. Novae – castra, canabae, vicus, 2013-2015. Preliminary report on the Excavations and Prospection Surveys of the University of Warsaw Archaeological Expedition, Archeologia 65, 2016, 177–203 (z:T. Sarnowski, L. Kovalevskaja, P. Zakrzewski, T. Dziurdzik, E. Jęczmienowski)
  12. Marcus Aurelius Statianus from Lower Moesia. A Note on His Origin, Status and Business [in] The Lower Danube in Antiquity (VI BC-VI AD), Tutrakan, Sofia 2007, 231–234 (z: T. Sarnowski).
  13. Dionysus or Liber Pater? The Evidence of the Bacchic Cult at Novae (castra et canabae legionis ) and in its Hinterland [in] Ad fines imperii Romani. Studia Thaddaeo Sarnowski ab amicis, collegis discipulisque dedicata, A. Tomas [ed.], Warszawa 2015, 257–275.
  14. The Mithreum at Novae Revisited [in] Ad fines imperii Romani. Studia Thaddaeo Sarnowski ab amicis, collegis discipulisque dedicata, A. Tomas [ed.], Warszawa 2015, 227–247 (with M. Lemke)
  15. Female family members related to soldiers and officers of the legio I Italica. A case study [in] Colonization and Romanization in Moesia Inferior. Premises of A Contrastive Approach, L. Mihailescu-Bîrliba [ed.], Kaiserlautern 2015, 93–124.
  16. Pre-Roman Settlements in the Hinterland of Novae in Lower Moesia: a re-assessment of the displacements of the conquered tribes by the Romans [in] Romans in the Middle and Lower Danube Valley: Case Studies in Archaeology, Epigraphy, and History, first century BC – fifth century AD, E. de Sena, C. Timoc (eds),A.R. Int. Ser. 2882, 2018, 13–22.

Barbarian tsunami Migration Period between the Odra and the Vistula

Exhibition Barbarian Tsunami is dedicated to dramatic events in the history of Europe which disturbed the civilization of Late Antiquity between the end of the 4th and the early 6th century, the time known as the Migration Period. Those were the days of intense migration of Barbarian tribes which invaded the Roman Empire with territories throughout Europe and North Africa and struck the final blow to the Western Roman Empire. They often established their own kingdoms over its ruins. Some of these tribes, recorded in Late Antique written sources, originated from the Odra and the Vistula river basin region which they inhabited in the first centuries AD. They played a crucial role in the events of the Migration Period creating the new order in medieval Europe. Evidence of their presence on the territory of Poland as well as contacts with other Barbarian communities and the Roman civilization is discovered in different regions between the Baltic Sea and the Carpathian Mountains. These are very often some of the most spectacular archaeological finds from the territory of Poland which are later of great value in museum collections of archaeological objects.

Barbarian tsunami Migration Period between the Odra and the Vistula

Forging Society at Late Bronze Age Mycenae

Person conducting research: Dr Stephanie Aulsebrook
Country: Greece
Site name: Mycenae
Type of the site: settlement and extra-mural cemeteries
Involved institutions: IAUW

Description of the research: This project is focused on Mycenae, the foremost centre on mainland Greece during the Late Bronze Age (17th – 11th C BC) and the relationship between its inhabitants and metals. Metals have a very varied role in prehistoric societies; they can be used for the manufacture of a diverse range of objects including tools, weapons, vessels, jewellery and armour but their comparative rarity and unique properties meant that they also had a significant role in the political economy.

In general, archaeologists have directed their attention towards the latter and that has meant that our understanding of the use of metals in the daily life of the community as a whole is not so well understood. To address this imbalance, my project has three underlying objectives:

1) to ascertain which social practices included metal artefacts and which did not.

2) to investigate access to metals within the community.

3) to reconstruct the typical biographies for different types of metal artefacts and explore atypical situations.

To achieve these aims, the first part of this project involves the creation of a database covering all known metals finds from Mycenae, as far as is possible. Published data will be supplemented by hands-on examination of the material. Once the database is completed, the data will be subjected to a series of qualitative and quantitative analysis, with the production of distribution plans a key priority. This type of holistic approach has not been attempted before and it is envisaged that this methodology ought to provide information concerning the usage of metals across the entirety of the community at Mycenae.

Project financing: SONATA 14 NCN competition

Current progress: the bespoke project database has been designed and is now live. The majority of the data available from the main publications of the site has now been entered and the focus has moved to checking through the annual excavation reports issued by the Archaeological Society at Athens. Here is an example of a catalogue entry:

Example of Entry in Database

Due to the current pandemic, some changes have been made to the project’s schedule as the Mycenae Excavations Archive is currently closed. However, progress is continuing and the project is still on track.

 

Stephanie Aulsebrook

Stephanie Aulsebrook
PhD Stephanie Aulsebrook

e-mail:
s.aulsebrook@uw.edu.pl

duty hours:
wtorek 12:00 – 14:00

research interests:
Aegean Late Bronze Age, metal artefacts, object biographies

Forging Society at Late Bronze Age Mycenae

Aegean Metalware – Collaboration with Dr Christina Clarke (ANU)

bibliography:

Aulsebrook, S. 2019. Crisis at the Cult Centre: Evidence from the Megaron Basements, in K. Żebrowska, A. Ulanowska and K. Lewartowski (eds.) Sympozjum Egejskie. Papers in Aegean Archaeology 4 and 5. Warsaw: University of Warsaw Press: 111-121.

Aulsebrook, S. 2019. Materialising Mythology: the Cup of Nestor from Shaft Grave IV at Mycenae, in K. Żebrowska, A. Ulanowska and K. Lewartowski (eds.) Sympozjum Egejskie. Papers in Aegean Archaeology 4 and 5. Warsaw: University of Warsaw Press: 79-89.

French, E.B. and S. Aulsebrook. 2018. Italy and Mycenae, in M. Bettelli, M. Del Freo and G.J. van Wijngaarden (eds.) Mediterranea Itinera. Studies in Honour of Lucia Vagnetti. Rome: CNR – Istituto di studi sul Mediterraneo antico: 67-76.

Demakopoulou, K. and S. Aulsebrook. 2018. The Gold and Silver Vessels and Other Precious Finds from the Tholos Tomb at Kokla in the Argolid. Annual of the British School at Athens 113: 119-142.

Aulsebrook, S. 2018. Chicken or egg? Rethinking the relationship between the silver and tinned ceramic vessel assemblages. Annual of the British School at Athens 113: 75-118.

Aulsebrook, S. 2018. Rethinking standardisation: the social meanings of Mycenaean metal cups. Oxford Journal of Archaeology 37: 147-163.

Aulsebrook, S. 2017. Repair, recycle or modify? The response to damage and/or obsolescence in Mycenaean metal vessels during the Prepalatial and Palatial Periods and its implications for understanding metal recycling. Studi Micenei ed Egeo-Anatolici NS 3: 7-26.

Aulsebrook, S. 2017. Late Bronze Age manipulation of light and colour in metal, in C. Duckworth and A. Sassin (eds.) Colour and Light in Ancient and Medieval Art. London: Routledge: 35-45.

Aulsebrook, S. 2016. Placed with care: interaction with decorated Mycenaean metal vessels, in M. Mina, Y. Papadatos, and S. Triantafyllou (eds.) An Archaeology of Prehistoric Bodies and Embodied Identities in the Eastern Mediterranean. Proceedings of a conference held 10-12 April 2012, Nicosia, Cyprus. Oxford: Oxbow Books: 71-77.

Aulsebrook, S. 2015. Retrieving capacity data from crushed lead vessels: an example from the House of Lead, Mycenae. Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry 15.3: 201-211.

Marea – settlement and cemetery (Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Early Islamic periods)

Person conducting excavation: dr hab. prof. UW Tomasz Derda
Country: Egypt
Site name: Marea
Type of the site: settlement and cemetery (Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and Early Islamic periods)
Involved institutions: Institute of Archaeology University of Warsaw, Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology University of Warsaw, Archaeological Museum in Krakow
Description of the research: On the southern shore of Lake Mariout, 45 kilometres west of Alexandria, Polish archaeologists have been excavating for several years the ruins of a large Byzantine city. The city, patiently uncovered structure after structure, was built exactly on the spot of an industrial centre and a harbour which functioned until the third century AD. Traditionally, the place was called Marea, following its (uncertain) identification with the most important urban centre in this part of the Mediterranean before the foundation of Alexandria of which we learn from Herodotus and Thucydides. A great transept basilica built in the end of the fifth century, the second largest church in Egypt (49 x 47 m), is the most magnificent building on the site. Next to the basilica, the archaeologists uncovered two bath complexes, a large house dating to the Late Antique period, warehouses, and latrines. Four massive piers (the longest measuring over 120 metres) extending deep into the lake date to the Roman period; they could serve several ships simultaneously. We know that large production workshops manufacturing pottery on a mass scale, as well as glass workshops, were located nearby. The apse of the basilica was constructed right on a pottery kiln which with its diameter of more than eight metres is one of the largest in Egypt. The kiln was used until the beginning of the third century AD, as indicated by the chronology of the last batch of amphorae prepared for firing which was found under the apse. Our neighbours on the site, archaeologists from France, have discovered on the peninsula a warehouse building functionally connected with the harbour. This structure was in use in the Ptolemaic and Early Roman periods. The remains, dated to the first century BC – beginning of the third century AD point to an intensive industrial exploitation of the area. We are in a region that produced wine on a great scale and exported it in amphorae which were also locally manufactured. The size of the kiln, the proportions of the warehouse, and the sweeping scale of the piers’ construction show that “Marea” was at the same time a remarkable industrial centre and a significant harbour.